On top of the Mountain

"I’ve Been to the Mountaintop"

By Martin Luther King, Jr.

“..I would move on by Greece and take my mind to Mount Olympus. And I would see Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Euripides and Aristophanes assembled around the Parthenon. And I would watch them around the Parthenon as they discussed the great and eternal issues of reality. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would go on, even to the great heyday of the Roman Empire. And I would see developments around there, through various emperors and leaders. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the day of the Renaissance, and get a quick picture of all that the Renaissance did for the cultural and aesthetic life of man. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even go by the way that the man for whom I am named had his habitat. And I would watch Martin Luther as he tacked his ninety-five theses on the door at the church of Wittenberg. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would come on up even to 1863, and watch a vacillating President by the name of Abraham Lincoln finally come to the conclusion that he had to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the early thirties, and see a man grappling with the problems of the bankruptcy of his nation. And come with an eloquent cry that we have nothing to fear but "fear itself."

But I wouldn’t stop there.”

Source: American Rhetoric: Delivered on April 3,1968 Mason Temple (Church of God in Christ Headquarters), Memphis, Tennessee

Well, I did it and I made it.

Yesterday I posted about my trip to Temescal Gateway Park and walking the Temescal Canyon Trail to the top.

Reaching the waterfall and being able to document it and experience its changes was great; but after that, I still had a half mile climb to the top, plus I still had to make my way back down. In total, the trail is about 2.5 miles, however it feels much longer because of the long up and then the long down.

Was the climb worth the effort?

Absolutely, making and setting goals, then executing and accomplishing them is both tremendous life lessons and enable us to move forward in life. How many times do we read an article, blog, and/or listen to somebody who reminds us of this daily?

I’ll be going back for more soon:

Here you can see the grandeur of the city, spreading for miles and miles, plus the beauty and depth of the Pacific Ocean.

I then turned my head to the right side, and was greeted with this shot:

Although the sun does detract a little, if you look closely over the horizon, you can see a small island out in the distance. No sooner did I snap this photograph, I was then told by a fellow hiker, that this island is only visible from the mountaintop a few days per year.

As I followed the trail a little further down, the views just kept getting a little better:

That’s downtown LA in the center frame–with Beverly Hills, Westwood, and the San Gabriel mountains off in the distance. In total, the view length of this is about 20 miles, which to me is just amazing and comprises the perfect way to be able to actually look and to use the camera to share.

Today’s post was the tip, and tomorrow’s post will be including the views and sights on the way down.

Keep Travelin’ Local both here and where you live, by keeping it real.

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8 comments to On top of the Mountain

  1. Karen Chaffee
    February 12th, 2009 at 8:19 am

    Traveling to new places, for me, is like visiting new worlds. Your photos are exquisite!

    Karen

    Karen Chaffee’s last blog post..On top of the Mountain

  2. LisaNewton
    February 12th, 2009 at 1:13 pm

    @Karen Thank you so much. I love travelin’ to new places, but I’m slowly discovering that some of the best places are in our own backyard……………….:)

  3. Lisa's Chaos
    February 12th, 2009 at 1:41 pm

    I bet you felt great while at the top and once you were back down! I love hiking like this! Just waiting for winter to be over to do it again, trudging through snow is exhausting! Beautiful views! I’m so glad you shared with us!

    Lisa’s Chaos’s last blog post..My friend, Cathy

  4. LisaNewton
    February 12th, 2009 at 2:37 pm

    @Lisa Yes, I’ve always loved hiking, although I used to have to drag my kids along, but once we got there and started walking, they usually got into it.

    Spring is just around the corner, so I’m looking forward to seeing some of your hiking pictures……………….:)

  5. Mark
    February 13th, 2009 at 5:58 am

    Always amazing…thank you for sharing!

  6. LisaNewton
    February 14th, 2009 at 6:39 am

    @Mark Thanks…………….:)

  7. Husbandhood
    February 15th, 2009 at 12:28 am

    Came here via problogger. Its obvious that you are into photography. I have been as well for many years. I suggest you look into purchasing the Digital Photography Book by Scott Kelby. Every page is a golden tip. For example, he writes that if you are going to shoot landscape shots then the only times during the day are around dawn and around dusk. That’s when the lighting is just perfect. Any other time during the day and your just wasting your time. If you look at most of all the pro landscape shots they were all taken at these times.

    Husbandhood’s last blog post..Looking To Buy A Stroller For A Good Price? Try eBay

  8. LisaNewton
    February 15th, 2009 at 4:37 am

    @Husbandhood Thank you for the suggestion. I’ve been to this park before in the early morning hours and at least that day, was unable to see the ocean. I love taking pictures and am definitely looking to improve my photography, but I can’t limit myself to hiking just in the dawn or dusk. Plus, coming down this trail at without full light, I’d probably break a bone………………:)

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